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., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 170 and the nays are mented mouse is -- the motion is not adopted. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the gentleman from maryland. mr. van hollen: i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. this will be a five-minute vote. a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 223 and the nays a
and are receiving reports this morning of the attacks against the united states embsy in cairo and the u.s. consulate in bengazi in libya. in libya, our ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in the service of our nation. our thoughts and sympathies today are with the families of these brave americans. these attacks remind us of the sacrifices made on a daily basisaway foreign service officers, diplomatic security personnel and our marine security guards. i joi my colleagues in strongly condemning the murder of these innocent americans, and i strongly support employing every available tool at our dissal to ensure t safety of americans overseas and to hunt down those responsible for these attacks. yesterday, we commemorated the anniversary of the attacks of september 11, and today we are reminded that brave americans serve us every day at the risk of their own lives. we honor the americans we lost in libya and we will stand united in our response. among the things we can agree on in washington is that the attacks on the u.s. and its representatives ll be met with r
continuing interest in military matters. now, in 1917 the united states goes to war. fdr goes to see what your willson and tells him he wants to resign his post and he wants to be in uniform. wilson said know you're doing an important job where you are. when the united states is deeply involved in world war i, she's determined to get to the western front and against the resistance of his boss, the navy secretary daniels manages and their key to that office in a vaguely military uniform of his own devising. he wears pants tucked into he was a french army helmet and a gas mask. in september of 1939 ranks summer and then came portugal and bulgaria. he's the commander-in-chief of the army that trans with trucks marked tank and whose soldiers trained with hand grenades substituted by eggs. by the time the war has been underway for a number of months, clinton is pretty much with its back to the wall to countries and the netherlands and as most france, denmark, norway have been conquered by the germans and the invasion of britain seems imminent he's determined to try to do something to help the
be a movement for the united states to withdraw to fortress america, to renounce our -- our -- our service to the world in helping these countries achieve the same democracy and freedom that our forefathers strived for? i do not mean to use his death as any kind of political agenda, but i think my friend and i remember him well enough to know that the worst outcome of this tragedy wod be for the united states to withdraw. in fact, i am confident that if he were here, he would be urging us to get right back in, get -- bring these extremists to justice and press on with the democracy and freedom that the people of libya deserve and have earned at great loss of blood and treasure. mr. lieberman: mr. president, i couldn't agree more with my friend from arizona. it would -- it would really dishonor the service of chris stevens and the three other americans who served us in libya if their murders by these extremists led us to retrench and pull out of libya and stop supporting the new libyan government, democratically elecd, pull out of other parts of the arab world. that would be exactly the opp
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
to take action against terrorist the plots. whether it confronts us here in the united states or abroad. in june of 2009, fbi directer acknowledged the challenge facing the bureau stating, "it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate the terrorist attack developing intelligence, developing facts. and the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the directer's statement. and then on november 5, 2009, a gunman walked in the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas and shouted the jihaddic term. and opened fire on unarmed soldiers and civilians. he killed 13 and wounded 43 42 others. was the most horrific terrorist attack on the u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will exam the facts of the fort hood case as we know them to better understand how these facts
steer america towards a fiscal cliff. we have voted 65 days this year in the united states senate. there are a number of things. you raise the one about the payroll tax cut, we haven't passed an appropriations bill this year. why is that? harry reid laid it out earlier in "the national journal." forget passing bills, the democrats want to pass the blame game. i see this. we haven't figured out if they are going to pay doctors next year. 30% cut. the president says he has extended the life of medicare, only if he lowers what they pay doctors who take care of doctors 30% and freezes that for the next 10 years. for somebody on medicare, they will have a difficult time finding a doctor to take care of them. host: it appears something fleeds to be done. your payroll tax conferee last year agreed to extend the payroll tax cut holiday for another year. are you in favor of doing so again? guest: i voted against the conference committee report. i don't think it's going to be extended this year. we are looking at tax rates going up. death tax coming back in a much more onerous way. there is
in the foreign service, he won friends to the united states in far-flung places. he made those people's hopes his own. during the revolution in libya, he risked his life to help protect the libyan people from a tyrant. he gave his life helping them build a better country. people loved to work with him. as he rose through the ranks, they loved to work forehand. he was known not only for his courage, but for his smile. goofy, but contagious. for his sense of fun and that california cool. in the days since the attack, so many libyans, including the ambassador, who is with us today, have expressed their sorrow and solidarity. one young woman, her head covered and her eyes haunted with sadness, held up a handwritten sign that said "thugs and killers do not represent a benghazi or islam." the president of the palestinian authority, who worked closely with chris sent me a letter of remembering his energy and integrity and deploring "an act of ugly terror." many others from across the middle east and africa have offered similar sentiments. this has been a difficult week for the state department's and for
control at the u.n. over the death of the american ambassador. the president of the united states noticeably nowhere to be seen and a brawl breaks out at a plant that makes apple product, forcing it to shut down. so, what's it going to mean for your new iphone? let's go "outfront." >>> good evening. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, iran slaps israel. iran's president ahminedjad is on american soil tonight and i was with him today. he was smiling, making joke, very relaxed as he took questions from a group of journalists at his hotel. he kept asking us to exchange views. not just ask questions. and in his answers, he called israel's threats to attack iran's nuclear program, in his words, a blip on the radar screen. >> translator: principally, we do not take seriously what the scientists ta say in threatening iran. >> so it's hard to imagine a more clear bow off than that, right? until you hear this. >> translator: they have been ok pieing those territories for the last 60 to 70 years with the support of force of the westerners. they have no roots there in history. iran is a va
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
-- the world of nation-state, those independent units that are truly sovereign and do not depend or take orders from anywhere else. the west can no longer do what it assumed it could do for its citizens. it needs to reach out for help. so you have got this system living in an uneasy coexistence with this globalize the world, and you say, "are we losing power?" though the very nature of power is different now than it used to be. you all in your textbooks say, cassette and these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other" -- "these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other," but it is much more complicated now. >> i would add that the concept of what makes up national security has changed. it is a much broader field now. you have to deal with economic issues. you have to deal with cybersecurity. you have to deal with a world that is largely asymmetric. as we play it back on the 20th century, which was not that long ago, you almost yearn for the ordered ways of the 20th century. we had essentially a bipolar world, two different ideologie
people. because the senate bill was inclusive and every woman member , republican, of the united states senate voted for it. everyone. that was the difference between the two bills. those who were included and a more specific group that are now included, which we think they ought to be, but we also think there aren't people include who had need to be. with all due respect i think my characterization was absolutely accurate. but it's interesting, mr. speaker, that we still haven't eabed the question -- answered the question. we tend to want to talk about other things. 98% of americans should not get a tax increase on january 1 that are making less than $250,000 individually as a family. i think we agree on that. mr. speaker, now i haven't heard that we don't agree on that but we agree on that which means there are 2% on which we do not agree. and that bill has not been brought to the floor that passed the united states senate dealing with that 98%. or 97% of small business. now, mr. speaker, it seems to me if we have agreement on 98% and the president of the united states will sign that
. the united states of america with their two presence in afghanistan with peace and stability, then you are personally the national interest of pakistan because the known and unknown objective of pakistan within the region is also peace and stability. why talk about the regional approach is to give you confidence for your buck the talk of first doing that. that she must not look at us, but she must look at us from the lens have today in the toasty today the future that pakistan wants for itself as that of peace and stability in. and we have a peaceful, stable region, everything else will work great. so is a march on i think we need to send each other messages. one of the means is to send that message out, that we are keen to work together to ensure that in afghanistan we are able to achieve together long sustainable fees, less admitted that we are not able to achieve. so let's work together. this put our energies together, our resources together. let's not blame each other. let's find time to sit together to work through this together because as i said, this is something that in this re
made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are -- the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 354 and the nays are 62. the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 355 and the nays are 62, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the the gentlewoman from california, to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5865 on which the the yeas and nays are ordered as amended. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 5865, a bill to promote the growth and competitiveness of american manufacturing. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill as amended. members will record their votes by electr
american forces like we had not seen in years. one of the first mobilizations was our united states military. and they were called to serve bravely in remote corners of the global. 11 years later the mastermind of 9/11, osama bin laden, was taken down, and we now have an al qaeda that is severely diminished, and we are bringing our troops home from that part of the world. but, mr. president, for the troops when they come home, the fight is not over. there's another fight when they get back home to america. it's a different type of battle. the unemployment rate among veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan was just under 11% in august. it's higher for those who are younger, and this problem is likely to continue to grow as we draw down in afghanistan, just like we've already drawn down in iraq. it's worth noting that there have been steps made in the right direction. this past summer we passed legislation that'll help veterans get federal occupational licenses when their military training matches the civilian requirements. that was a bill that i had the privilege of sponsoring.
is flying at half staff. ladies and gentlemen, the national anthem of the united states. [playing "the star-spangled benneranner"] >> ladies and gentleman, the united states army chief of chaplain, major general. >> let us pray. remember the events of september 11, 2001. pray for all of those who greek today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack -- pray for all of those who grieve today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack, on a day when the worst visited our nation, our spirits were inspired what we saw at grand 0 and at the pentagon. we pray for the men and women who have been called to defend our country both at home and abroad. inspired by their legacy, we ask for continued courage and strength in spirit to faithfully serve our military and our nation. we are thankful that in our time of loss, you have not abandoned us to our grief. help us so that we may do your work, peace and justice, offering forgiveness and building community. hear us, lord god, in your holy name we pray. amen. >> a mamen. >> 11 years ago, the pentagon was attacked. please join us in obs
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
be described as young a. >> thank you so much. there is no organization in the united states that is better at serving as a forum for the principal legal issues of the day fo. i have been asked to comment as well on the voting rights. kerrey has done such a good job. there is very little to add. then i will talk about the business cases. the two. i would make about the act is first to think about why it is the justices would get involved. these cases are not in the docket. in the illustration in to help the court work. the justices have a rule that says if we're point to strike down a federal statute, that is our job. they're likely to step in. the voting rights act case, several of them come on a peel. you have to ask the supreme court to grant review. there are slivers of cases in the united states coal that there is a right to go to the supreme court. they have different ways of dodging them. we almost have to take. they suggested very serious concerns about the constitutionality of section 5. the second point out and make is what to expect from the pivotal justices. this is at the cente
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
trying to find solutions to the problems of the united states of america. if he loves the united states of america, he should be out on his hinny getting this stuff done instead of talking all over this television and running romney down. host: thanks for the call from dayton, tennessee. want to give you one more story on the day, this from "the washington post," for politicians privacy vanishes in the age of video technology. mitt romney's mistake in speaking bluntly at a may fundraiser was not only in the words he spoke but failing to anticipate the ears they might breach, and audience that looked like an exclusive group of republican donors this week multiflied thanks to the pervasiveness of video technology. they are already confiscating smart phones but they have been largely overmatched as time and again moments intended to be kept secret have turned up on the internet. there is a total collapse of the notion of private space that the republican strategist, and top advisor of senator john mccain's presidential campaign in 2008, increasingly, politicians who say one thing behind cl
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
of the united states. >> find any speech from both the democratic and republican conventions online at the c-span video library. >> during the republican and democratic conventions, we're asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president, as part of this year's c-span student cam video documentary competition. in a short video, students will answer the question, what's the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, and there's $50,000 in total prizes available. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grade 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to student cam.org. >> i want c-span, c-span2 and the books portion of c-span, because i feel it's important to be knowledgeable about what's going on in the world, and i feel that c-span gives the most information about what's going on in specific subjects, where a lot of television doesn't do that. >> hillary pate watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
privilege as far as being a citizen of the united states to vote and be part of the process. that is all i have to say. host: frank newport, it sounded like from the comments last night by mitt romney that they were really focusing on from here on out approaching voters who had voted for obama in 2008 and looking to lure them to the romney campaign. is there any way that gallup will be checking that attempt? guest: absolutely straight -- absolutely. we track daily. for a republican to win, they have to pull back in some of those voters. if the same scenario happens this year that unfolded in 2008, obama is going to win again. republicans have two goals -- one is to activate the core republican voters and get them to turn out, which is easier for republicans and democrats, because republicans are more likely to vote. they have characteristics like age and education that make them more likely to vote. the second task is to pull down at 7% margin that obama had over mccain, so they have to come in to become a convert some of those people who went for obama to go to romney, or they were going
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
as proactive as it has been because there as been paralysis on the fiscal side in the united states. there really has not been any effort on the republican -- on the political side to do much about the job situation. the burden has fallen disproportionately on the central bank. with the too much government is the problem, that is a discussion we have been having since the beginning of time. host: unemployment by education level, 12% with those with high school education, with college, 6.6%. guest: people like to talk about the more education you have the less unemployment you have. unemployment has gone up for all of the groups. college graduates or not, people are struggling. you could have a large student loan and not find a job. host: we have a caller. go ahead. caller: how many of the jobs are jobs with which people can support themselves or their families? guest: you make a fair point. the unemployment rate is one measure of unemployment. there is also a measure that tries to take into account people who are working part time, but would rather be working full time. if you inclu
the united states and it was designed in a way that it didn't require going to the court and the national security agency or others who are trying to wiretap people outside the united states. the problem is that in defining the parameters of what communications would require and what surveillance is required and which ones didn't the statute referred to the technology of the time as communications that were wired in communications over radio, the satellite technology. the problem is in 1978 we see a dramatic change in technology of communications and in particular fiber-optic cables all over the world which is actually very much changed the routing indications that change the requirement, the court order requirements they face when they try to get into electronic surveillance in the result of that is that leading up to 9/11 there are many instances where the government would have to go to the fisa court to get an order from the fisa court for the could electronically surveilled or wiretap someone overseas and that was not the intent of fisa. the intelligence surveillance act the amendment
/11, and thanks to the is on the road to defeat and bin the united states of america. [applause] back. all the troops from bliss highlanders. deployed later this year. fight. you know this. ultimate sacrifice, including day last month. our message to them was this. we will honor them always. pushed the taliban back. month. war responsibly. lead for their own security. in 2014, the transition will be complete. never again. [applause] think about it. and afghanistan. thirds. home. and what does that mean for you? prepare for the future. your spouses and your kids. stronger. restore american leadership. don't you believe it. our alliances have never been gaddafi. leadership. top. [applause] incredible service. war, we are destroying terrorist leadership. proud that the united states is is more respected in the world. a pledge. have served us. in them. to your families. hey. [laughter] interest. when we do, we will give me the equipment and a clear mission to get the job done. [applause] world, bar none. superiority. [applause] to scare you. find a plan to reduce the including defense. threate
was that, as the group here in the united states -- the united way is allowed to deduct from paychecks, yes? in order to have their funding, we wanted to have the same kind of thing possible for this international overseas giving program, which encompassed about 10 very worthy groups. we were actually beaten down on that by the united way who did not want anyone else to have such president, such a privilege, even though the funds -- such a precedent, such a privilege, even though the funds would not be competitive. it would not be going to anybody else in the country but overseas. isen's health care considered in many places a luxury and certainly far down on the list of the imperatives for that nation's funding. >> what should we take away from the virginia state legislators attend to require ultrasound for any women seeking abortions. [laughter] >> you know, it is a good thing my daughter is here. i woke up this morning -- somebody had brought this up yesterday and i was so bloody angry i said, you know what i am tempted to say and she said, don't say that, mom. so i will follow my daught
to fund programs all over the united states where we wouldn't only improve -- we wouldn't only build things that we need, but improve them. the american society of civil engineers has addressed this issue, mr. speaker. what they have said, 2.3 trillion of infrastructure maintenance needs to be done. i come from the city of minneapolis and in my city, we had a bridge fall into the mississippi river. maintenance in this country is critical. we have bridges that are old and deteriorating all over this country. we have bridges that are in need of repair, roads as well, and we also have other projects that need to be taken care of, in terms of our grid and wastewater treatment, in terms of all types of important infrastructure. but we have not invested. we are relying on things that our grandparents gave us. we are relying on eisenhower-era infrastructure, because we haven't in our age focused on the needs of the american people to have infrastructure bill. just to talk a little bit more about the american jobs act, it would also extend cutting payroll taxes in half for 98% of businesses.
in the united states. we at the bush center -- are here with the their spouses we're fortunate to be associated with smu. our relationship with smu competed our expectations. i hope we have exceeded your expectations. we're very much involved in action oriented programs. i didn't want to be known as a think tanker. i want to be known as an a,-oriented place that can make a difference in the world. and so i want to thank you very much for having faith in us when we first convince you to support the bush center on the smu campus. we just got back from africa which is. we went over there because at the bush center, one of the major initiatives is to honor human life. we believe all life is precious. whether they live in america on the continent of africa. we are disturbed by the fact that many women who have got the hiv virus, are getting cervical cancer not much is being done with it with your help we put together a collaborative effort to save lives. part of the mission was to kick off the red ribbon in bots wanna as well as to follow up in zambia where we kick it off in december. we wanted to g
and a white america and latino america and asian america. there's a united states of america. >> eight years after the keynote that launched his national career, four years after becoming the nation's first african-american nominee, tonight president barack obama accepts the nomination a second time. tonight the president makes his case for four more years. >> four more years. >> america needs four more years. >> tonight more from the first lady, vice president biden, caroline kennedy, the foo fighters? yes, the foo fighters. weather moved tonight indoors. but after a first night owned by michelle obama, after a second night owned by president clinton, expectations for the finale are sky high. msnbc's primetime coverage of the democratic national convention's final night begins right now. >>> thank you for joining us. i'm rachel maddow here at msnbc headquarters in new york. i'm joined by ed shultz, melissa harris-perry, chris hayes, and the senior strategist steve schmidt. lawrence o'donnell and al sharpton will be joining us in a moment. leading us from the site of the convention is our co
's a crude film. they know it has nothing to do with the united states government. it is an excuse. one intelligence person told me, if you scratch the surface, and if you gave every street vendor from street vendor to prime minister in that region a chance to throw a rock at the u.s. embassy, they would. so this is their excuse. >> look at what's happening in afghanistan 11 years later. >> and look what's happening in afghanistan. and is it just me? willie, is it just me, or is it -- we have the grave concern about the tragedy that happened to the ambassador and our people that have served so proudly for, you know, for the state department who were killed. and yet this weekend, more u.s. troops in afghanistan gunned down by our supposed allies. this happens every day. this happens every day. and yes, our u.s. ambassador being killed is just absolutely horrific. but every single day, young american men and women are gunned down in afghanistan. >> 51 of them this year on insider attacks. 51 nato troops including many americans this year. >> nobody's talking about it. >> to your point exa
in our laws. our constitution protects the right to practice free speech. here in the united states, countless publications provoke offense. like me, the majority of americans are christian and yet we do not plan blasphemy against our most sacred beliefs. >> watched that and was ripping my hair out. do we really think that was about the movie. here he is legitimatizing that point of view saying all this had to do with the movie. first of all do you believe that the attacks on the ambassador were -- >> president obama were a law professor he would describe that as a red herring that is totally irrelevant concern that takes the obama administration kind of off the hook for how they missed the ba on this. this was a planned attack. melissa: right. >> he had u.n. ambassador on a week and a half ago saying this was spontaneous attack that is ridiculous statement. these were grenades that were propelled in a massive way. these were massive arms. people don't bring these things to, to spontaneous demonstrations. now all this evidence is coming out that the ambassador himself had, had a dia
that israel is in a position whereby no red line by the international community, by the united states, israel may have to do what it has to do and then make the phone calls. melissa: yeah. we were all sort of stunned in the newsroom and stood up and looked at this because he is holding up this giant whiteboard to make his point. what do you think the reaction will be now? >> well the reaction of course on behalf of the iranian regime and their allies, that would be the syrian regime, hezbollah in lebanon, some politicians in iraq, hamas maybe, they could attack the prime minister of israel and accuse him of escalation. reality others in the region, such as saudies, kuwaities, threatened by the iranians have someone speaking on their behalf but not a arab leader, the leader of israel. melissa: i was in the middle east recently and leaders are definitely nervous. they see this as almost an inevitable conclusion at this point. do you think 70% to a bomb is about where they are? do you think it is even further than that? >> i think iranians are working on two tracks. one is slowly gradually to ge
, probably next year. >> i am telling you about this economic storm that hit us, growth in the united states is slow and we're selling fewer manufactured goods. guess what, americans think the future is so bright they have to wear shades. with the threat of going over the fiscal cliff looming, is all this confidence misplaced? we'll talk about this, next. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] its lightweight construction makes it nimble... ♪ its road gripping performance makes it a cadillac. introducing the all-new cadillac xts. available with advanced haldex all-wheel drive. [ engine revving ] it's bringing the future forward. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. because enbrel, etanercept, suppresses your immune system, it may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
the danger confronts us here in the united states or abroad. in june of 2009, fbi director robert mueller acknowledged the immense challenge facing the bureau stating: it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate a terrorist attack. developing intelligence, developing facts. in the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts and painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the director's statement. and then on november the 5th, 2009, a gunman walked into the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas, and shouted the classic jihadist term, allahu akbar, and opened fire on soldiers and civilians. he killed 14 and wounded 42 others. this was the most horrific terrorist attack on u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will examine the facts of the fort be hood case as we know them -- fort hood case as we know them
this country faces the starkest choice for president of the united states that has in that least my lifetime. that means in all of your lifetime. but for all the talk governor romney and congressman ryan have engaged in, they do not have the courage yet to tell you what their policies for this nation really are. it will shock you, i have the courage to tell you this morning with their policies are. [laughter] it's amazing if you listen to them. they talk so much about how they care about medicare. you would think it was a republican idea the way they talk about it. you think it was republicans supporting it. they talk about how they want to preserve it. they do it sincerely and talk about how they sincerely want to preserve and protect the benefits for all those people, guaranteeing all those people on medicare now, the 30 million seniors that nothing will change. if you listen to them these days, you would think that had been a republican plan all along. that's what they say and that is what they exude believe, and these are facts. they don't tell you that there fan with a meat -- their pla
. they are people like corporal dare onterrell hicks, united states army, from hawley, north carolina, who died july 19 of 2012, just two months ago. darian was a 2009 graduate where he was a standout students, loved and respected by all. darian always wanted to be a soldier. it was a goal he set early on and something that everyone remembers about him. it was a goal he pursued with diligence and honor. he was a model junior rotc student who was voted mr. junior r.t.c. by his peers. -- rotc by his peers. darian is remembered as the kind of young man a teacher wishes all their students were like. he was a boy you wanted your children to be friends with. he became the kind of man we should all be thankful to have in this world. when i was speaking with his mom, address, she said -- tracy, she shared with me he never gave her a problem, ever. corporate hicks enlisted in the army after graduating from high school. he loved the army and it seemed he had found his place in life. he loved his family and he kept in close contact with his mother. whenever he spoke with his mom, she would always tell him, alw
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